Friday, November 20, 2009

Fernleaf Full Moon Maple Fall Color



Fernleaf Full Moon Maple
Acer japonicum 'Aconitifolium'
(AY-ser) (juh-PON-ih-kum)

This tree is a handsome addition to any garden. It grows to about 20 feet tall with an equal spread. It can be kept smaller if the need be. The fall color is often a dazzling mixture of orange, red and yellow. With a hardiness zone rating of 5 (USDA) it can withstand quite cold winters. This tree should be more widely cultivated but you sometimes have to hunt for it at nurseries.

This second shot is the fall color on a ‘regular’ Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum. There were a few of these in the garden that looked like someone had plugged them into an electrical outlet they were glowing so red.


For gardeners in Connecticut beware that there are still ticks in the garden. I have been bitten twice in the last week and am currently taking the Doxycycline treatment for 28 days as a precaution against lyme disease. That makes a total of five bites this year. Cleaning up the leaves has been the culprit but it is impossible to know exactly where they came from.

6 comments:

JOE TODD said...

Beautiful colors.. Stay safe in the garden. Doxycycline if upsets your stomach take with food but avoid dairy products or anything that contains calcium.

Lara said...

wonderful colours! I hope the ticks will not give you any trouble!

Les said...

This is one of the under appreciated Japanese maples, I wish more people planted it.

Sorry about the ticks. I pulled close to 30 off of my newer dog a couple of weeks ago and two off of myself, my stomach turning the whole time.

Nisha said...

Oh oh, I am so much in love with this color!
I wish to have one in my place but I don't think it'll survive. :(

And sorry abt the ticks.

Janet said...

I have one of the 'regular' ones, it is just a wonderful color right now. I do love the look of the Fernleaf Full Moon!
No wonder there are so many ticks, it is still so warm.

Mazda Middle East said...
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